Four Things You Didn't Know About Your Cat's Brain | petMD

Chronic renal failure can affect both dogs and cats. If you would like to learn more about how this disease affects dogs, please visit in the PetMD health library.

Cats Scared By Cucumbers: Knowing the Facts Behind the Viral - petMD

Technically, there are no 100 percent hypoallergenic domestic cats or cats that are completely non-allergenic. All cats produce some amount of dander, so you won't find a dander or allergen-free cat. However, there are breeds that produce less of it and therefore make good cats for people with allergies. The following list of "hypoallergenic" cats is a guideline which petMD recommends for people who want to adopt a feline, yet feel options are limited due to allergies:

Top Ten Tips on How to Keep Your Cat's Teeth Clean | petMD

Cat in Pain | Cat Arthritis Symptoms | Pain in Cats | petMD But how do you know if you should give your cat probiotics? What kind of probiotics should you buy for your cat and how often should you administer them? petMD reached out to an array of experts who have studied the topic to find out more about probiotics for cats.

8 Common Ear Problems in Cats | petMD

petMD’s discusses the biggest contributor to feline obesity: diet. It might be hard to resist succumbing to feline charm and "free feeding" them, but consider this: Overweight cats live shorter lives. Obese cats suffer from heart and liver conditions, and can develop diabetes as a result of excess weight. Poor health due to overeating can be prevented by limiting their daily food intake.

Defining Senior Age in Cats | petMD


Some feline breeds exist that are considered "hypoallergenic" or low allergy cats. This is because they produce fewer allergens than others. Cats do produce pet dander, a common , but the culprit for the estimated 10 percent of the population who are allergic to cats may be a protein, Fel d 1, that is present in cat saliva. Technically, there are no 100 percent hypoallergenic domestic cats or cats that are completely non-allergenic. All cats produce some amount of dander, so you won't find a dander or allergen-free cat. However, there are breeds that produce less of it and therefore make good cats for people with allergies. The following list of "hypoallergenic" cats is a guideline which petMD recommends for people who want to adopt a feline, yet feel options are limited due to allergies: For more information on making cat allergies more manageable, learn with a few simple tips. Image: / via Flickr If you're allergic to cats but still want one, you're in luck! Read about hypoallergenic cat breeds on petMD to find the perfect low allergy cat for you.
Wondering what to do about overweight cats? Wonder no more! Learn about cat obesity, what to feed a cat for weight loss & how to put a cat on a diet on petMD.